Honda Jazz Hatchback Test Drive & Performance

Honda Jazz Overview

Since it pulled the plug on the hugely competent but overpriced and slow selling last-gen Jazz, Honda hasn’t had a contender in the premium end of the hatchback market. But all that is about to change with this new, upcoming Jazz. It may be an all-new model that’s built on a new platform but remains a car easily identifiable as a Jazz; credit the trademark mono-volume shape for that. Whether or not the basic design does it for you, there is plenty to keep you looking at the car. The City-like large, angular headlights that fuse into the multi-element grille, in particular, look very attractive. Look under the familiar glasshouse and you’ll also notice where Honda has made an effort to jazz up (pun intended) the rest of the car’s design. There’s a strong belt line that originates at the front doors and progressively widens towards the large 3D-effect tail-lights. Sadly, the mass of metal above the rear wheels does make the Jazz look under-tyred. The tail, though, is attractive and comes embellished with reflectors that flank the windscreen and a wide band of chrome that runs along the width of the boot. View Price & Offers on Jazz at CarzPrice

Honda Jazz Exteriors

The rounded and clean lines of the earlier Jazz gave it a long lasting aura that I doubt the new Jazz can match. On the flipside, the new Jazz looks sportier than before. This car is wrapped around with cuts and creases at all the right places to give it a more aggressive look, much more than cars in the segment are known to possess. The new Jazz, just like the new City it is based on, is a lot wider than before, accentuated by the elongated headlamps leading into the gloss black plastic panel housing the logo. A thin chrome strip below it keeps things understated. The Jazz doesn’t quite share any exterior detail with the City but the headlamps and grille share a common link, which is good. This car has a high percentage of parts with the City and so we are told that it wasn’t easy to price the Jazz competitively. But being sub 4-metre helps, as do the economies of scale.

Sharing its underpinnings with the City makes the Jazz feel a lot more aspirational, needed for a premium hatch. What I particularly like is the crease along the waistline of the car running all the way to the taillights. It also helps in toning down the MPV style profile of the car. The rear end of the car feels like there’s too much going on at first but the detailing of the lights and the chunky roof spoiler are nice touches. The taillamps look Volvo inspired and could do without the extension leading up to the spoiler.

Honda Jazz Interiors

Interestingly, this time around, only top-spec Jazz models will get the ‘magic seats’ at the back. These seats split, fold flat and flip upwards to make space for all shapes and sizes of cargo – that’s if the massive 354-litre boot won’t meet your needs anyway. These seats now also allow you to form a recliner by pushing the front seat backrests fully till they meet the rear seat base. It’s a unique feature picnickers and the chauffeur-driven will love. Those likely to spend more time in the back will also like how the backrest angle can be adjusted (a segment first) on top-end variants. However, the middle seat cushioning is firm and not very comfortable.

Up front, seat comfort is good but visibility past the thick A-pillars is limited and troublesome at crossroads. Otherwise, the Jazz’s driving environment is very similar to the City’s. The chunky steering, the instruments and the basic layout of the centre console are all very similar. The Jazz’s asymmetrical dashboard that comes finished in hard-wearing plastics extends further forwards towards the windscreen and the portion above the glovebox is more layered (there’s no secondary compartment like the old Jazz either). Still, with as many as nine cupholders and more than a few cubbyholes, you won’t find yourself short on storage spaces for small items.

Honda hopes you won’t find yourself shortchanged either. Because unlike the sparsely equipped old Jazz, the new one comes loaded with features. There’s a City-like dial-operated 5-inch colour screen for the rear-view camera and infotainment system with a larger 6.2-inch touchscreen offered on top variants. The touch-operated panel for the climate control system from the City also finds its way here and there are also steering-mounted buttons for audio and telephone functions.

Honda Jazz Engine

You get a 1.2-litre petrol mated to a 5-speed gearbox, 1.5-litre diesel with a six-speeder and a set of CVT equipped petrol variants. The diesel engine is the one we are now familiar with. It does duty in Amaze, City and Mobilio and develops 100PS of power at 3600rpm and 200Nm of torque at 1750rpm. It is known to be a noisy unit but a very efficient one and in the Jazz, there are no surprises here. The short but strong midrange is where the Jazz comes alive, eager to push on but the six-speed gearbox will urge you to move up a gear ever too quickly to keep it at its efficient best.

The petrol engine we love. It wants to rev and has a wide and happy midrange making light work of traffic without demanding a downshift. It develops 90PS of power at 6000rpm and 110Nm of torque at 4800rpm. The shifts are slick and the clutch is light; the Jazz petrol has one of the best engine-gearbox combinations in the segment. The CVT is smooth but saps out the engine when used conventionally. While paddle shifters for a CVT are gimmicky, seven preset ratios make it that slight bit sportier when you need to make that overtake. It’s also marginally more efficient than the petrol. For information on contact details of Hondai car dealers in Pune visit Hondaprice.in

Honda Jazz Driving Dynamics

So how is the Jazz to drive? It’s as light and agile as you’d expect from a Honda hatch. Ride quality is excellent at slow and medium speeds. We haven’t got the chance to test its stability at high speeds due to the narrow roads of Goa but we did get to test the tyres. These are designed keeping efficiency in mind and so don’t offer the levels of grip we would have liked. The electric steering is light and offers no feedback, which is expected, but it weighs up well and is direct. The Jazz turns in well into corners and stays composed till the tyres reach their grip limits.

Honda Jazz Braking and Safety

Braking power on the hatchback is derived from front disc and rear drum brakes. As for safety, features such as dual front airbags, ABS with EBD, rear parking sensor, speed-sensing auto door lock and day/night inside rear view mirror are standard across line-up.

Honda Jazz Price In Mumbai

Honda Jazz Ex-Showroom Price in Mumbai ranges from 5,95,178/- (Jazz E MT Petrol) to 9,29,064/- (Jazz VX MT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Jazz from Honda Dealers in Mumbai

Honda Jazz Bottomline

If space and versatility are paramount, there is quite simply no better option than the Jazz. Helping the Jazz’s case this time around is the fact that it can be had with a diesel engine and even in petrol automatic form meaning there’s a version of the car for every type of hatchback buyer. In every form, the Jazz comes across as a car that’s comfortable and well suited to the requirements of day-to-day city driving. It’s not exciting per se, but that’s unlikely to impact an average buyer’s decision. What will, is the price.

The good news is that, save for the top-spec VX versions available on the petrol manual and diesel cars, the rest of the Jazz range is competitively priced. So, in its latest form, the Jazz has the ingredients to become the hit it always deserved to be.

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